D.K. Foreman – Personal Blog

African-American Community

Protecting the Lambs: Aspiring teen model struck by train during photo shoot

by on Mar.18, 2017, under 2017 Year, African-American Community, Protecting the lambs, Revival In America

(CNN) — A Texas teenager who wanted to become a model was struck and killed by a train during a photo shoot.

Fredzania Thompson – or Zanie as she was known to family and friends – was a student at Blinn College, but she had a bigger dream.

“She wanted to model. She definitely had the talent, and the smile for it,” Earl Chatman, her fiance told KBTX.

According to authorities, Thompson was having photos taken with the train tracks as her backdrop. She began moving away from a train coming down the tracks when she was struck by another train coming in the opposite direction, on another set of tracks.

Police say they are investigating the incident, as is “common practice for our agency.”

Fredzania Thompson

“We do not speculate any foul play at this time,” Justin Leeth, the police chief of Navasota Police Department told CNN.

On Monday, family and friends of Thompson gathered to celebrate what would have been her 20th birthday.

“Zanie always wanted to make sure everyone was okay. This is paying our tribute to her,” Chatman said to KBTX.

A funeral for Thompson is planned for Saturday.

CNN attempted to reach out to Chatman for this story, but our request for comment was not returned.

Comments more...

Ben Carson Just Announced His Role In Trump Admin, Obama’s Legacy Is Gone

by on Nov.10, 2016, under 2016 Year, African-American Community, Leadership

ar-151029777

Dr. Ben Carson has become one of the most liked individuals in the Republican party. He’s insanely smart, well-tempered, and is certainly someone America respects in regards to healthcare.

Dr. Carson has just indicated that he will be helping President Trump craft a replacement for Obamacare, which has been one of the cornerstones and promises of Trump’s presidential campaign.

From Politico: Ben Carson says he’s still ironing out his role in the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump, but one thing’s certain: He’ll have a role in helping craft the replacement plan for Obamacare.

“I think the replacement obviously must come first and it must be something that is very appealing and easy to understand. And then, only then, would you dismantle what’s in place,” the retired neurosurgeon said in an interview.

Asked if he intends to be involved in designing that plan, Carson said, “Yes, of course.”

Carson, who ran against Trump in the Republican presidential primary, burst onto the national scene in 2013 when he rebuked Barack Obama’s health care law at the National Prayer breakfast, while the president sat a few feet away. He declined to say whether he was in line for a Cabinet role such as secretary of health and human services, or a broader advisory role.

There’s no other person in America more qualified to know what works and what doesn’t than Dr. Ben Carson. Rest assured, whatever he comes up with will be the best solution possible.

FINALLY, we have someone who has spent their life in healthcare that will be crafting policies and solutions that will actually work for America.

Comments more...

In Memoriam: Evangelist Denise Katrina Matthews (1959-2016)

by on Feb.16, 2016, under 2016 Year, African-American Community, Leadership, World News

NEW YORK — Denise Matthews, the singer, model, and actress known as Vanity who toured with Prince in the 1980s before eschewing her wild persona for a life as a minister, died Monday in Fremont, Calif.. She was 57.

Vanity in the 1980's

Vanity in the 1980’s

Ms. Matthews’s sister Renay Matthews confirmed her death. She said Ms. Matthews had checked into a hospital Saturday night after years of health problems related to her kidneys.

Denise Katrina Matthews was born on Jan. 4, 1959, the daughter of Helga Senyk and James Levia Matthews, and grew up in Niagara Falls, Ontario. She worked as a model in Canada before moving to the United States.

She met Prince at the American Music Awards in 1980, and the two soon became romantically involved. He also invited her to be a part of Vanity 6, the funky, erotically charged girl group that had a hit in 1982 with “Nasty Girl” and toured with Prince. She appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone with Prince, in a portrait shot by Richard Avedon, with her hands creeping down the front of his pants.

Prince and Vanity in 1982

Prince and Vanity in 1983

Ms. Matthews was supposed to play the female lead role in “Purple Rain,” the semiautobiographical Prince film that was a box-office hit in 1984, but she abandoned the project before filming began. She went on to release two albums as a solo artist on Motown, “Wild Animal” and “Skin on Skin.”

She thrived on raciness, often performing in lingerie. “My music is very sexual, so you could say I’m just putting all of me out there,” she told the Associated Press in 1985. She was on the cover of Playboy in 1988.

As an actress, she appeared on television and in films including “The Last Dragon,” “Never Too Young to Die,” “Action Jackson,” and “52 Pick-Up.”

By her own later admission, Ms. Matthews led a fast life, and it took its toll. In an interview with Jet magazine in 1993, she said she had been “extremely wild” in her younger days.

“There was a lot of cocaine,” she said. “I tried men, women, everything. I didn’t snort cocaine, I smoked it.”

Denise "Vanity" Matthews Pictured Center with fellow band mates Brenda Bennett on left and Susan Moonsie on right in the former girl group Vanity 6

Denise “Vanity” Matthews Pictured Center with fellow band mates Brenda Bennett on left and Susan Moonsie on right in the former girl group Vanity 6

She told Jet that drug use had nearly killed her: She had had renal failure a few years earlier and was told by doctors that she had only three days to live.

After that experience, her life took a religious turn. She left the name Vanity behind and became a Christian evangelist.

Evangelist Denise Matthews

Evangelist Denise Matthews


“All I had become was thus painted on my face — vanity,” she later wrote on a personal website.

From Vanity to Denise the Evangelist

From Vanity to Denise the Evangelist

According to her sister, Ms. Matthews eventually became an ordained minister and preached in churches around the country. She published an autobiography in 1999, “Blame It on Vanity.”

In the mid-1990s, Ms. Matthews was briefly married to the professional football player Anthony Wayne Smith, who was sentenced to life in prison for murder last month.

Her and I used to love each other deeply. She loved me for the artist I was; I loved her for the artist she was trying to be.’ – Prince

Prince, onstage in Melbourne, speaking about his former tour-mate
Quote Icon
As news of her death spread Monday during the Grammy Awards, many musicians expressed their condolences on social media.

“Vanity was everything to me,” wrote the drummer for The Roots, Ahmir Thompson, better known as Questlove.

The rapper MC Hammer said he had been in church with Ms. Matthews on Saturday. “Vanity left church after giving a beautiful testimony,” he wrote.

Onstage in Melbourne on Tuesday, Prince offered a tribute of his own. “Her and I used to love each other deeply,” he told the crowd, according to Australian news media accounts. “She loved me for the artist I was; I loved her for the artist she was trying to be.”

Comments more...

Praying for Revival in 2016: ‘Hideous’ shooting leaves pregnant woman, Mardi Gras Indian big chief dead in New Orleans East

by on Dec.18, 2015, under 2015 Year, African-American Community, Endtimes, Leadership, Revival In America

MATT SLEDGE AND KATY RECKDAHL| MSLEDGE@THEADVOCATE.COM
Dec. 16, 2015; 11:06 p.m

Photo provided -- Breon Stewart, left, and Lionel Delpit III.

Photo provided — Breon Stewart, left, and Lionel Delpit III.

The latest victim of fatal gun violence in New Orleans had not even been born yet, but he had a name.

A shocking shooting Wednesday night in New Orleans East claimed the lives of a pregnant woman just days away from giving birth, her boyfriend — the Big Chief of the Black Feather Mardi Gras Indian tribe — and their unborn child.

Neighbors said dozens of shots sounded just before 10 p.m. in a parking lot of the Wind Run Apartments in the 12100 block of the Interstate 10 Service Road. When the shooting was over, Lionel “Bumma” Delpit III, 25; Breon Stewart, 23; and the couple’s baby, whom they had planned to name Lionel Delpit IV, were dead in the front seat of their vehicle. Police were left searching for suspects.

One neighbor, who declined to give her name out of fear for her safety, said the couple had just pulled up to the apartment building in a blue 2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser. She heard no sounds before the gunshots began, she said.

Another neighbor, who also declined to give her name, said she could see the anguish on first responders’ faces as they realized that Stewart, who had celebrated a baby shower this month and was due to give birth by Christmas, could not be saved.

The deaths of Delpit and Stewart were the 151st and 152nd homicides of the year in New Orleans, a grim milestone that means the city has now exceeded last year’s total of 150 killings.

The Wind Run killings also were the seventh slaying to claim more than one victim in New Orleans East alone this year.

Cmdr. Doug Eckert said police are waiting on the results of the autopsies to determine whether the unborn child’s death will be counted as a homicide.
Stewart had shared much of her pregnancy with her twin sister Britnee, who recently gave birth herself. A photograph on Britnee’s Facebook page shows both siblings cradling their very pregnant bellies, wearing matching clothes.

Stewart was the 2011 valedictorian at George Washington Carver High School. Her sister was the salutatorian.

Delpit was the son of Lionel Delpit Jr., the longtime chief of the Black Feather Mardi Gras Indian tribe, who died in 2011. Other Indians groomed the younger Delpit to assume the chieftainship of the 7th Ward tribe.

Friends and acquaintances shared a steady stream of shock online after word spread of the killings.

“This world is sick but New Orleans is sicker,” one wrote on Facebook. “I hate it.”

Tulane University football player Leonard Davis, who knew the couple, also spoke out on social media. “No, I can’t believe this, man,” Davis said. “Not you Bummer, this can’t be life.”

Tyrone Yancy, who helped Delpit’s father form the Black Feather tribe in 1992, said he said seen the younger Delpit on Sunday at Indian practice, one of the weekly musical rehearsals that Indians hold as Mardi Gras approaches. “He wanted to put all of his energy into his girlfriend and their baby,” Yancy said.

Second Chief Corey Rayford also spent Sunday night with the young chief. He’d seen potential in Delpit, his cousin, and a motivation to achieve, he said.

“He was paying attention,” Rayford said. “He wanted it. He was creating his own style. That’s what he was focused on, just making his daddy proud.”

On Mardi Gras Day, Rayford will feel an emptiness on the street behind him, in the spot where the chief walks. “It will be hard for me to look back and see him not there,” he said.

Rayford said his cousin and girlfriend had their priorities straight. “They weren’t preparing for that baby. They were prepared,” he said.

Delpit was working two jobs to provide for his unborn son, Yancy said, and they had been talking with doctors about inducing labor next week if the baby didn’t arrive by then.

On Sunday, Rayford asked him, “You getting ready for Mardi Gras?”

As the tambourines shook behind them, Delpit told Rayford that, for the moment, the Indian tradition was taking a backseat.

“I’m getting ready for this baby,” Delpit said.

Indians from across the city massed Thursday night at Hunters Field, a traditional 7th Ward gathering spot, to honor the dead. Mourners danced, wept and shook tambourines raised high in the air as the crowd grew larger by the minute.

Wild Magnolias Big Chief Bo Dollis Jr., who helped organize the event, said he had last seen Delpit in line at the Carnival supply shop Jefferson Variety on Tuesday. They spent so long talking that the clerk passed them over and took the customers waiting behind them.

Even though he is an Uptown Indian and “Bumma” was from Downtown, he said, they always felt a special bond as second-generation chiefs carrying on the legacy of their fathers.

“It’s younger people like us that are carrying the tradition on, so we always stuck together,” Dollis said.

Gaynell Sorina, the Big Queen of the Black Feather Indians, recalled that when Delpit’s father was on his deathbed, he gave her an instruction: Never leave someone without telling them that you love them, because it may be the last time you see them.

Sorina broke down in tears as she said that when she had seen Delpit earlier this week, they had parted in just that way.

Eckert, head of the Police Department’s Criminal Investigations Division, said at a news conference that detectives were following up on several tips. He urged members of the public to call police with any information they might have.

“We feel confident that this wasn’t a random act,” Eckert said. “It’s a hideous crime. There’s no good time for a homicide, there’s no good time for a murder, but this, right before the holidays, just makes it that much worse.”

Comments more...

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!